Vegan Swedish Meatballs with Brown Gravy / Veganske Kjøttkaker med Brun Saus

 

In Norwegian this is called “Kjøttkaker i brun saus”, this has always been my little sister’s favorite dinner. This dish is basically as Norwegian as it could get, especially when served with potatoes and a cabbage-salad. Traditionally it is made by forming minced meat into balls and cooking it in meat broth, but this is obviously not something I would make. It was her idea to make this and I immediately got to thinking around what I could use. She thought of it as she was walking home from school actually. As she was on her way home she walked past a house that was serving dinner, and she smelled the delicious spices she used to love. When she figured out that it was swedish-style meatballs she was somewhat disgusted yet intrigued. She called me up right after that and asked if I try and make this in a healthy and vegan manner, and sure enough I did.

 

The most important part of the entire recipe is the spices. You need to taste frequently and make sure you add a lot of it, otherwise this will taste very bland! Now I am sorry to say that this recipe is not soy-free. I simply cannot think of another way to make a smooth and creamy gravy without using organic silken tofu.

 

Vegan Swedish Meatballs with Brown Gravy / Veganske Kjøttkaker med Brun Saus

 

Ingredients, makes 4-5 servings:

The “Meatballs”:

  • 3 cups certified gluten-free oats
  • 1 cup buckwheat flour
  • 1 cup certified gluten-free oat flour
  • 2 cups vegan vegetable broth (can use water)
  • 4 tbsp gluten-free soy sauce
  • 1 large yellow onion, chopped
  • nutmeg, to taste
  • black pepper, to taste
  • cardamom, to taste
The Brown Gravy:
  • 450g silken tofu
  • 1 1/2 cup water
  • 6 tbsp gluten-free soy sauce
  • 3 heaped tbsp homemade almond butter (I think tahini would work as well)
  • 3 tbsp vegetable broth powder
  • 1 1/2 yellow onion, chopped
  • 5 cloves of garlic, minced
  • nutmeg, to taste
  • black pepper, to taste
  • cardamom, to taste

Serve with:

  • steamed vegetables and potatoes
  • Light and Creamy Cabbage Salad (recipe coming soon)

 

Directions:

  1. Start by making the meatballs. Combine 2 cups oats with 2 cups vegetable broth (or water) and let this sit for a few minutes before adding in all the remaining ingredients (for the meatballs), except for the remaining 1 cup oats. Mix well, and add in a bit more oats if necessary. If the batter is too thick add in more water. The dough should be quite thick, and remember to add in a lot of the spices!
  2. Let that sit while you move on to making the gravy. Heat up a large pot and add in the chopped onion and garlic while stirring. Let this brown a bit before adding in the remaining ingredients before grabbing a hand blender and blend until completely smooth. You can also use a regular blender, but remember to let it chill slightly before adding it in. Let this sit on low heat while you cook the meatballs.
  3. Grab a spoon and add in a large dollop of batter into a large medium heated non-stick pan. Cook however many meatballs you can at once (depends on the size of your pan), and do so about 5-10 minutes on each side. Remember that it might take a bit longer due to the meatballs being very thick. When all of the meatballs are done, place them on a plate and place a kitchen towel (or something similar) on top so they preserve as much heat as possible. Serve with steamed vegetables and potatoes.

 
Vegan Swedish Meatballs with Brown Gravy / Veganske Kjøttkaker med Brun Saus

 

You might notice that this recipe is inspired by one of my first recipes ever posted, which was the Vegan White Gravy recipe. If you were looking for similar recipes I just made another category called Vegan “Meat” Dishes, and I will start adding in all these kinds of recipes there.

 

As always I hope you enjoyed this recipe and leave me a comment letting me know if you made it!

 

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9 Responses to Vegan Swedish Meatballs with Brown Gravy / Veganske Kjøttkaker med Brun Saus

  1. Vegan Gran says:

    I haven’t made this recipe as we cannot get GF oats or oat flour in my country, but I wanted to write you with my compliments for being the only young vegan I’ve come across who actually gets involved with the nutrition side of veganism.

    So many young ones convert to veganism and then proceed to eat junk food and highly processed and sugary foods and then they wonder after a while why they’re not feeling too good on the diet. I worry for them and what they’re doing to their health. Good on you for being the exception, and an excellent one too!

    • First off, thank you so much for your comment and I couldn’t agree more with all you said! I find it unbelievably annoying how people try going vegan once (which basically means just cutting out the animal products while still eating processed junk), and then go on blaming veganism as the reason why they are feeling tired/nauseated/fatigue. Overall, there is far too little focus on encouraging the younger generation on eating healthily and it is saddening to see so many people struggle with illnesses that could be prevented.

      Also, if you do not have a gluten allergy/intolerance you can easily use regular rolled oats. Oats are naturally free of gluten, and the regular kind only contains trace of gluten (caused by being processed in a factory that also handles other grains) which most gluten sensitive people can handle. Either that or you can probably find an online store that ships gluten-free oats to your country :) If you try it out be sure to let me know what you thought about it!

      Best Wishes,
      Solveig

  2. Laura says:

    Oooh! these look delicious! I am planning on trying them out soon! great blog, Solveig, I really enjoy reading it! Godt Nytt År!

  3. Laura says:

    I made these tonight and they turned out really well!! so tasty!! thank you so much for the wonderful recipe :D

    http://i1327.photobucket.com/albums/u678/lulusadventures13/553147_10101535139649912_406225373_n.jpg

  4. mrbear says:

    what kind of vegetable broth and vegetable broth powder do you use?

  5. I am very excited to try these! This was a favorite dish that my mother made as I was growing up. My dad’s side is Norwegian, and we frequently had “Swedish Meatballs.” I love your blog because it covers recipes that American blogs don’t cover. And I do remember that nutmeg was “the” spice to use. We here in the U.S. are such a mixture of so many backgrounds, that you truly cannot go wrong making something traditional. Thank you for this recipe! Finally, I can have my Swedish Meatballs, again! :D